Where Are You Going, SharePoint?

I would like to do a short retrospective look to the rapidly-changing landscape of SharePoint in the last few years, followed by a personal opinion on the future of SharePoint. It is a fairly long rant piece, so it is advised to have at least 15 minutes at hand to read it throughly.

Note: It is obvious to me but won’t hurt to mention that everything mentioned here expresses my own opinion and my own opinion only. 

How SharePoint has evolved from 100% on-premise to hybrid and cloud

In the early years of SharePoint development, in the early 2000’s, the development on the SharePoint platform was restricted to the server-side code. You could only code what you could put inside the SharePoint box. Of course, the server object model let you do all sort of things, as it is the same model that was used internally by SharePoint (at least a significant portion of it). But, you were responsible for the performance and side-effects of that code as it was run inside the SharePoint very own IIS process or service. As long as you did your homework, the future was bright for you.

For the less prone to scare the IT people by stubbornly insisting on putting custom code in the SharePoint box, there was a second option: the ASMX web services. Clumsy as they were, they were the only option if you couldn’t (or wouldn’t) put your custom code in SharePoint servers.

Over the years, that approach was good and great. Best practices and guidance began to evolve and we saw less and less SharePoint "crime scenes" (as Matthias Einig puts it).

And then, Microsoft began hosting its own product, by launching SharePoint Online inside its BPOS (Business Productivity Suite).

Suddenly, Microsoft began feeling how it was to actually host SharePoint. They began to experience the same nightmares IT admins over the world had to experience when they wanted to patch their SharePoint servers. They weren’t shielded any more from the customers running SharePoint: they were the customer running it and they were responsible for their tenants and their SharePoint data.

 

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SharePoint Online administrator Installing cumulative updates

During the first teething years of SharePoint Online, one thing emerged clear and painfully clear. It was the insight that what worked for a single datacenter doesn’t work for cloud environment, with multiple tenants. The customizations wouldn’t scale and what’s even worse, they would break with the frequent updates to the SharePoint version on Microsoft servers. Even with the stop-gap measure of sandboxed code, the customizations that involve code didn’t behave as Microsoft wanted for their hosting environment.

In other words, during the golden years SharePoint allowed massive customization with server-side code. You could build web parts, web controls, timer jobs, application pages and all sort of server-side extensions. You were allowed to shoot yourself in the foot and bring your SharePoint to a halt, because it was your own datacenter. You (or hopefully your governance committee) would decide what was more important. Also, you could put arbitrary code in your customizations and be happy with it. However, when you depend on your SharePoint servers running smoothly and flawlessly, it is only possible with plain-vanilla SharePoint structures with no customization. As careful as you were, there was always a penalty for your custom code. As for the security of that code, things such as CAS policies were a step in a right direction but many customers just turned their code trust level in web.config to Full and live with it.

How scalability and performance have taken precedence over customization

But, not Microsoft. Microsoft could not allow SharePoint Online to fail. Also, the prospect of selling monthly licenses instead of a one-time license was meant to inject significant cash flow into Microsoft Office Division balance sheets. Between the need of the "less desirable" one-time customers (who wanted custom code) and the need of Microsoft SharePoint Online cash cow (who wanted scalability and performance), the scales tipped to the side of the scalability (pun not intended).

So, things such as client object model and finally  "cloud application model" came to be. Your code was allowed, as long as it run outside SharePoint. The infrastructure was put into place to allow your code to call into SharePoint without the need for explicit credentials. Your calls to SharePoint were carefully securized, throttled and channeled to allow for non-customized SharePoint parts to run without being blocked or delayed.

SharePoint erred on the side of the performance, banishing server code on cloud deployments and slowly banishing (or deemphasizing) even the declarative customization. As long as you are fine with the evolving standard SharePoint Online features, you are good to go. Want more? Plug in an app, even if the client object model didn’t allow for all the richness of the functionality that server object model did. Your application would run on your servers, consuming your resources and leaving their SharePoint instances out of your bad influence.

What’s the future for on-premise SharePoint customers?

But, what Microsoft doesn’t seem to get (or does seem to ignore) is the reality of the corporate customers. SharePoint was never a software for small companies. Yes, you could run a SharePoint Foundation (or Windows SharePoint Services before that) and it was free, but the need for the corporate-scale collaboration and knowledge management that SharePoint ushers is something that goes with the medium and big companies, as it breaks department silos and culture barriers. Also, the hefty price tag for the SharePoint license didn’t help.

Now, SharePoint Online as part of the Office 365 package is affordable. Even smaller companies could take advantage of it. But, are they doing it? In my experience, the vast majority of the Office 365 customers in small companies are more interested in Exchange Online, because running a mail infrastructure is something every company does, small and big, while running SharePoint is something that is not everyone’s piece of cake. Whenever I listen to Microsoft marketing machine trumpeting about "millions of Office 365 users" I can’t help asking myself how many of them are only using Exchange Online out of the whole Office 365 package. (Answer: I don’t know but I imagine that a vast majority).

So, here we have Microsoft cranking out new features to suit their "imaginary" customers that want wizards, flashy UI and shiny settings, while the real SharePoint customers with deep pockets are placed between a rock (declining investment in new on-premise features) and a hard place (the fact that Office 365 deployments customization options are limited at best). They need freedom to customize their SharePoint to suit their needs, and right now the capabilities of the app model and Office 365 app model are just not enough. Not to mention the need for UI customization, which is the first thing that corporate customers want. They now have to jump through hoops just to deploy and keep their master pages, CSS and JS files from breaking with each SharePoint Online update. Not good.

As a side note, the need of the on-premise clients for top-of-the-notch social without hassle was the driver that made Beezy, the company I work for, possible. If that capabilities were available on SharePoint Server, we would be out of business even before starting.

That has been by experience with the SharePoint customers that are more or less "invited" to become Office 365 customers. Only a few of them venture into the hybrid world of connecting their on-premise farm with the Office 365 farm. In the future, this number will increase, but will it ever be so overwhelming as to dispense with the on-premise SharePoint. My opinion is that it won’t. We won’t see the end of on-prem SharePoint in the foreseeable future.

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What lies ahead?

Why I so firmly believe this? First, the cloud is not fully parring the on-prem world. I know that SharePoint is just the "expression" of the solution for a business need, but right now going to the cloud makes you lose certain flexibility (in the depth of your customization) and gain another flexibility (on the deployment and operation costs). So, there is still a gap between what cloud enables you to do and what SharePoint Server enables you to do. In the future I believe that the gap will be closing, but not disappearing. Yet, the cloud will allow us to plug-and-play different services and technologies to build our solutions. It will widen our choice of options, not narrow it down.

I think that we will see more and more hybrid deployments but there will always be on-premise deployments with workloads that are only suitable for that scenario. Conversely, there will be (and there are) cloud-only scenarios such as machine-learning powered Delve and Outlook Clutter that can’t be deployed on-premises as it requires some really BIG data (pun intended) to work properly. But, for a big company with their own processes and dynamics, I just can’t see a cloud-only environment, no matter how hard I try to imagine.

However, the love SharePoint Server got from Microsoft during the last decade has gone to the new, cloudy sweet-heart: SharePoint Online. It is a fact.

I would like to imagine the future SharePoint Server (call it vNext or 2015 or whatever) to be more like Windows 8 than Windows XP. Windows XP had to be replaced with Windows Vista and it was a fairly traumatic deployment. But, Windows 8 was "updated" to Windows 8.1 with little or no hassle, and you ended up with very different Windows. In another times, it maybe would be called Windows 9 and would have to be deployed in a "traumatic" fashion. In the same light, I can imagine future SharePoint getting periodic updates (as Windows or Visual Studio do), with new and enhanced features, not only bug fixes. I can imagine that the main development branch is the cloud one, and that not all the features can translate to the on-premise version, but I can’t imagine a reason for not having that kind of quick, iterative development for the cloud that "trickles down" to the SharePoint Server periodically. Gone are the days of 3-year cycle for SharePoint Server, the cycle is now merely couple of weeks long. It is perfect for the cloud, but I think (and hope) that it will also add enhancements to the on-premise customers. Let’s face it, SharePoint is a fairly mature product with a broad set of features. What corporate customer need is not to have the latest eye-candy, "sexy" features but fixing the long-standing pains of basic, staple SharePoint features. I’m not saying that there is no value in the new features, there certainly is. However, there is no excuse for having half-baked functionality any more in SharePoint, online or not.

What’s the future for SharePoint specialists?

In the end, where it leaves us, the SharePoint developers, architects, consultants, Power Users, customizers and so on?

It is normal to feel a certain amount of dizziness and feeling of being let down. Microsoft messaging to the customers is something chronically ambiguous, although the transparency set by some of the teams in Microsoft is exemplary in the last years. They are improving. But still, giving mixed signals or flatly ignoring the rightful questions of the corporate users is making them question whether Microsoft commitment can be taken seriously. (Yes, I mean Silverlight and sandbox solutions and autohosted apps and so on).

Well, let’s face it: the world is changing. It never stopped changing. We can’t cling in the comfort zone anymore, if we ever did. I think that the pace of technological change has accelerated and with it comes a natural reluctance to change (I explain some of it in my Pluralsight course about human behavior). We have to embrace that change.

What does it mean? It doesn’t mean drinking the Microsoft Kool-Aid and firmly believing their marketing messages. They have all the right to send whatever signals they want, but we SharePoint specialists are paid to assess and advise our clients about their technology, not to repeat it like trained parrots. In many cases the message is perfectly valid, but in many cases it is not and we should know better. As I said before, SharePoint (and Office 365) were, are and will be the tools to build solutions for business needs. Not the solutions themselves. Sometimes, we lose track of this simple fact.

It means that we should learn, practice and keep raising the bar. We are on the front line of technology and we should be prepared. Luckily, it has never been more easier to learn new things and find guidance (The OfficeDev PnP team is just the example of that). Dedicate some time to play with the cloud, to experiment with apps, JavaScript and hybrid environments, to fiddle with Delve and Office Graph and to keep pushing the envelope. You will be acquiring new tools to build your technological solutions to business problems. That’s your job as a technology specialist.

What are your opinions? I’m eager to know them.

All images provided by Freeimages.com.

6 thoughts on “Where Are You Going, SharePoint?”

  1. Hi Edin! Really good article. I have been thinking about it, too. I am thinking also about the main scope and main area of SharePoint. I see many customers that realize that SharePoint is no good for public-facing sites. SharePoint Online even drops the public websites: http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-confirms-it-is-dropping-public-website-feature-from-sharepoint-online/

    A couple years ago SharePoint (for those who had money) was THE system. SharePoint was used for intranets, lob applications, extranets, internets.

    Today, I see the trend that SharePoint is used for areas where it is strong, like document storage, collaboration, but less as a CMS system.

    1. @Anatoly, I fully agree. We have been completing the cycle: SharePoint Collaboration + Content Management –> SharePoint as THE platform –> SharePoint/Office 365 as collaboration and content management + enhancements from other cloud capabilities.

      @Dirk, Thanks for translating my ideas and sharing them with the German community. I am glad that we think alike 🙂

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